King Tut mask

King Tut
Photo courtesy of Grand Rapids Public Museum

With a mysterious death and unidentified parentage, King Tut still has people talking. The conversation continues with the Great Lakes regional debut of The Discovery of King Tut May 16 at the Grand Rapids Public Museum.

Making only the third stop on its US tour, The Discovery of King Tut combines media and over 1,000 replicas of the most important finds reconstructed by master Egyptian craftsman to tell the story of the discovery of the tomb and give insight into the beliefs of ancient Egyptians and the afterlife.

The Discovery of King Tut gives visitors a chance to see recreations of objects that are no longer allowed to travel outside of Egypt, Kate Moore, vice president of marketing and public relations for GRPM, said. This will be the only place visitors can see objects like this and the story of the discovery told in this way - just as Howard Carter found it in 1922.

King Tut's open shrine
King Tut's Open Shrine Photo courtesy of Grand Rapids Public Museum

The approximately 90-minute tour is broken into two parts.

Upon entering, visitors are transported thousands of years back to the time of King Tutankhamun through a new type of immersive museology using media. Immersive museology uses media to recreate the experience of Howard Carter as he first discovered the lost tomb of King Tut after nearly five years of excavating in Egypts Valley of the Kings. The journey culminates in exact reconstructions of three burial chambers revealed just as Carter saw them including a large, open, gilded outer shrine of the Boy King's burial chamber.

After learning more about the culture of ancient Egypt, insights into the Egyptians' belief in the afterlife, and their efforts to overcome their fate and conquer death and transience, visitors have the opportunity to examine objects from King Tuts extensive burial treasure.

King Tut's canopic shrine
King Tut's Canopic Shrine Photo courtesy of Grand Rapids Public Museum

The Discovery of King Tut has something for all ages and interests.

Moore said many children will relate to the exhibit as Tut became king at the young age of nine. With that in mind, a children's version of the exhibition's audio guide is available for their listening and learning enjoyment. Art enthusiasts will also enjoy the experience through the remarkable recreations.

Purchase tickets today for this popular new exhibit running through January 2016.

Another fascinating exhibit making a stop on its nationwide tour is American Spirits: The Rise and Fall of Prohibition coming to GRPM late September 26, 2015 to mid-January 2016 which includes artifacts from the GRPM.

Prohibition Mugshots area of the American Spirits: The Rise and Fall of Prohibition exhibit Prohibition mugshot area
Photo courtesy of National Constitution Center

"After loaning more than 15 artifacts from our own collection for the exhibits tour, we were asked if we would like to be one of the tour stops," said Moore. "We bring in several traveling exhibitions per year and are proud to add American Spirits: The Rise and Fall of Prohibition to our lineup."

This collection will showcase over 100 rare artifacts, including temperance propaganda, flapper dresses from the Roaring 20s, and authentic items used for making moonshine and other illegal potent liquors.

Visitors will also have the opportunity to learn the Charleston in a re-created speakeasy and play the role of a federal Prohibition agent chasing rumrunners in a custom-built video game among other Interactive elements that will bring the sights, sounds, and experiences of the time period to life.

Popular clothing in the 1920s at the American Spirits: The Rise and Fall of Prohibition exhibit Popular clothing in the 1920's
Photo courtesy of National Constitution Center

So book your tickets and plan a trip to GRPM. Inspired visits to Egypt and the 1920s await!